Gender neutrality has been skiing uphill for so many years and just when you think the slope will plateau to generate real progression in mainstream storytelling, in walks Hollywood

After leaving the cinema in 2015 having just watched the shiny new Jurassic World film with my family, I said, ‘Well, that was shit. That literally just put storytelling back 25 years.’ Which is an obvious embellishment, that also happens to be true. But what was more interesting was how my sister replied. ‘Sure,’ she said, ‘but it also put feminism back 25 years.’

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Source: Universal Pictures Amblin Entertainment, Jurassic Park, 1993.

Much discussion and biting, rapier critique of Jurassic World’s high-heel wearing, T-rex dodging, morally bankrupt female ‘main character’ later and I realised that not only were we both lamenting the same issue — because, without great…


In a rush to create a memorable character everyone thinks they have to design a deluge of eccentric characteristics and quirky flaws. Stoner is the antidote to this, proving the remarkable can lie in the unremarkable.

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Source: New York Review Of Books, 2003, The reissued cover

It’s 1 am. I’ve just finished reading Stoner, John Williams’ posthumous classic for the second time. I can’t sleep. How can I knowing I’ve been touched so heartily by a character who now exists more in my soul than in those tender pages which reveal his broken but wholesome life? For that’s the true achievement of Stoner, the deft creation of a character who defies comparison with his gentle ordinariness and manages to burrow his way into your heart nonetheless.

Occasionally when you consume a story you’re invested in the character’s lives, in their journeys, so much so you walk…


Another breakout show nobody is talking about but definitely should!

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Source: Netflix, Into The Night

Imagine Lost, except they’re stuck on a plane trying to outrun the sun

That’s the high-concept premise and hook for Netflix’s 2020 hit, Into The Night. And right from the get-go, the show draws you in with its unending pace: there’s just something about a desperate looking man walking into an airport that keeps the audience on edge. For the next four hours, you never leave the brink of your seat — mostly because the characters are barely in them. I unintentionally binged this six-episode series and found my eyes glued to the screen like a teenager to social media.

The simple idea is that the sun has turned deadly for an unspecified…


The only good thing about this film is when it ends…and if you don’t get that far, you’ll be the envy of those who did.

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Source: Netflix

The Midnight Sky? More like The Midnight Dry…….That was the worst dad joke ever and it still managed to be lightyears better than this meandering, pathetic, muddled, and surprisingly hollow space adventure now streaming on Netflix. I won’t waste people’s time talking too long about something that’s just not worth it; suffice it to say I’ll simply summarise why George Clooney’s new passion project doesn’t deserve more than five minutes let alone it’s two-hour run time.

The funny thing about this Sci-Fi bore is that it’s so down-to-earth it’s characters all want to leave it. And if they don’t, we…


Is there a reason Stephen King adaptations start well but fizzle before the ending?

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Source: HBO

We’ve all been hooked by a Stephen King premise: A cast of innocent characters is beset by a terrifying entity and struggle to figure out the answers while escaping its grasp. It’s classic King and scares our socks off in most of his novels where we’re hiding under our bedcovers and looking at the mysterious dark space behind the door for the rest of the night. Yet, when it comes to adaption, the legendary writer’s stories have had trouble proving they can work as well on the silver screen.

You see, I don’t know the Stephen King books too well…


A few story tweaks and we might be able to get a much more engaging film experience

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Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Okay, I overexaggerated. In order to truly fix WonderWoman 1984, you’d have to change a hell of a lot more than the below story elements. My original breakdowns can attest to how much is exactly wrong with this film, and even they only scratch the surface. But these changes will at least bring it a lot closer to being good, if not make it less terrible.

Now, before I go in deep let me set the stage for the changes. For the first point, it’s important to explain that Max Lord, the main villain, has no real motivation or goal…


But they definitely should be!

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Source: ABC TV, Please Like Me

It’s hard in the spectrum of the omnipresent, pop-cultural, and troll-infested minefield of the internet to contribute something unique or unheard of. Yet, after I’d finished watching Please Like Me, a show now eight years past its original airing, I could find little to no discourse delighting in this undiscovered gem; a strange occurrence I hope to remedy and shine my critical, albeit humble, torch upon.

So, where do I start? Well, in the pilot episode we’re introduced to Josh Thomas(the creator and star) as his girlfriend breaks up with him prompting a sexual revelation and subsequent exploration, all while…


Passion, while limitless, isn’t relentless. And sometimes you need an extra kick to push you further than you thought possible.

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Photo by Noah Buscher on Unsplash

In my short foray into story and article writing, I’ve found that passion, a near-identical cousin to obsession, has a drastic impact on quality. Seems obvious, right? But there’s far more to it than simply asserting our best quality comes from things we’re passionate about. It comes also, from going beyond passion, into embracing — even if in a small way — obsession.

“The train of thought of an obsessed person always runs on a single track.”
Evan Esar

If passion is the thing that compels us into action then obsession is the thing that keeps us doing it even…


Continuing along our journey to find answers of how WW 1984 collapsed in upon itself

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Source: Warner Bros. WonderWoman 1984

This is a continuation of my first article. If you missed it, here’s the link:

4. Conflict, anyone?

There’s a similar scene in both WonderWoman films that perfectly exemplifies why the first film works and the sequel doesn’t. In it, characters have to dress up to fit in with the world they now find themselves in. In the first film, Diana has to dress against her will in order to fit in with a male-dominated world war one London. In essence, she must disguise and reduce her warrior identity where she doesn’t see the need to, producing conflict with Steve and with all…


The first film had its flaws but overall was a successful and strangely endearing adventure. This is just a 1980’s nightmare and not the good kind.

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Source: Warner Bros. WonderWoman 1984

Let’s start with some absolute honesty. I’ll just put it out there, full disclosure from the beginning so everyone knows: WonderWoman 1984 is utterly, remarkably and mind-blowingly terrible. So much so that I would say it’s probably the worst superhero movie of the last decade!

It’s so bad — and I can’t believe I’m saying this — it at times makes Justice League (2017)look less terrible. I know! When you can earnestly say that about any movie, you should do whatever you can to actively reconsider watching it. And at least Justice League had the common decency to be under…

Ryan Morris

First time storyteller looking to learn and share

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